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Cha Cha Cha - The dance originally came from Cuba where it was developed into the triple Mambo, gradually slower, more pronounced and clearer interpretation of the rhythm was evolved, called the Cha Cha Cha. The dance almost speaks for itself through the music where the beat of the bongo drums and marracas seem to sat 'step, step, cha, cha, cha'. Music arrangers are able to adapt many popular melodies into the cha cha cha rhythm creating its continuous interest.

Jive - During the Second World War, when big band swing was a the height of its popularity, the American GI's brought us a new style of improvised dance called Jitterbug. From this very popular style, and with the influence of Rock and Roll, which burst onto the unsuspecting world in 1954, our present day Jive has developed.

Rumba - The Rumba is a generic term covering a variety of dances, from many sources. The main growth was in the 16th century, in Cuba, when African slaves were inspired by the walk of the cockerel. In this primitive form it scandalised the whites, and so over the years became syncopated and more refined. The Spanish Bolero was later incorporated into Cuban dancing, and became popular in American dance halls between 1920 and 1950 as the Cuban Rumba. The Rumba was officially recognised in it's present day form in 1955.

Samba - Originally this was a Brazilian Carnival dance, whose name came from the dances performed by African slaves. It was introduced in a modified ballroom version at the New York Worlds Fair in 1939, and became popular in Europe after the Second World War.

Paso Doble - The Paso Doble is a French dance created from the inspiration of the march of the Matador into the bullrig prior to the Bull Fight. The man portrays the part of the Matador and the lady, his cape. Many of the figures in the Paso Doble have french names. The music has a very specific construction as it has 'high-points' that the dancers should emphasise throug their choreography.